201802.19

Official Decisions Change Lives and Intelligible Reasons Are Required

Transparency really does matter and official decision-makers are required to explain their reasons for reaching conclusions that affect people’s lives. That definitely did not happen in one case in which the High Court sent a man’s house-building plans back to the drawing board. The man had obtained outline planning consent to build a new home…

201802.19

National Minimum Wage Rates

The draft National Minimum Wage (Amendment) Regulations 2018 were published on 6 February and provide for the following changes to the National Living Wage (NLW) and the National Minimum Wage (NMW) rates with effect from 1 April 2018: The NLW, which applies to those aged 25 and over, will increase from £7.50 to £7.83 per…

201802.15

Using the Internet to Spread Malicious Rumours Is Not Fair Competition!

Legitimate competition is one thing, but using the Internet to spread false rumours about a rival’s products is quite another. In a recent case, a businessman who resorted to such methods found himself under threat of imprisonment. A company that produced stabilisers for use when towing caravans objected to videos that had been posted on…

201802.13

Dealing with Social Breakdown – Family Judges Are at the Sharp End

Family judges deal on a daily basis with the consequences of social breakdown and, in every case in which children are involved, their welfare is the primary concern. That was certainly so in one case in which the High Court ruled on the future of a two-year-old boy whose father was aged just 14 when…

201802.12

Employers Can Always Recruit the Best Candidate? Oh No, They Can’t!

At first blush, it might appear obvious that employers are entitled to take on the best candidate for a job. However, as one case concerning a highly qualified medical practice manager showed, immigration law requires that suitable, EU-resident, candidates must be preferred to those from overseas. The case concerned an Indian national with a first-class…

201802.09

The Government Responds to the Taylor Review of Employment Practices

In July 2017, Matthew Taylor, Chief Executive of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce and a former policy chief under Tony Blair, issued his report, commissioned by the Government, on how employment practices need to change in order to keep pace with modern business needs. The Review, entitled ‘Good Work’,…

201802.05

Dishonest Olympic Park Accident Victim Stripped of £27,000 Award

A dishonest minority of accident victims harm themselves and others by over-egging their compensation claims. The point was powerfully made by one case in which a pensioner who was injured after volunteering to help out during the 2012 Olympic Games was stripped of the whole of his damages award. The man suffered fractures to his…

201802.02

Client Confidentiality and Public Interest Journalism Collide

Communications between lawyers and their clients are strictly confidential, but what happens when they fall into the hands of journalists who say that the public interest demands their publication? The High Court is preparing to tackle that issue in a case in which millions of documents were hacked from a law firm’s database. The international…

201802.01

Gender pay Gap Reporting- Deadline Approaches

Whilst the BBC and Easyjet have headlined the news on the topic of differences in pay between male and female employees, it is important to remember that the requirement to publish annual gender pay gap data applies to all private sector employers with 250 or more employees and the deadline for the year commencing April…

201802.01

Farmer Who Cut Son Out of £3 Million Will Knew His Own Mind

Rational and fair bequests are almost never overturned by the courts and that is one good reason why you should seek legal advice before making a will. In one case on point, a farmer’s decision to leave none of his £3 million estate to his son survived intense High Court scrutiny. The farmer, who died…